Category: Everyday Prevention

Foam Rolling

Posted 2 July 2018 by prehab

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If you’ve been to our wellness clinic on the Upper East Side, you’ve probably seen our foam rollers—(you know, those long cylindrical pieces of foam that somewhat resemble rolling-pins for baking). Well, they actually serve a similar function for our bodies….ok, hear me out: when you put your weight on them and roll them along your muscles, they serve a variety of purposes, including a sort of self-massage that can be highly relaxing. So what exactly is this foam rolling-pin doing to our bodies? A big component is myofascial release. Fascia is a system of collagen fibers that surround our muscles, nerves, and organs. When we exercise or if we have old injuries, the fascia can become sore and restricted, causing discomfort and increasing our risk for injury. Foam rolling over tight areas can help release the fascia and helps allow it to repair. Think swifter recovery and heightened detoxification abilities. Be careful not to push it too hard, as foam rolling can be painful depending on how tight you are. Test the waters a bit and don’t dwell for too long on painful spots. You may need to work your way up to certain areas that are too tight. If you have an injury, ask your physical therapist if foam rolling is right for you. Feel free to ask us any questions you may have regarding foam rolling. We’d love to help clear up any confusion and demonstrate proper technique!

Here are some other great benefits of foam rolling:

  • Reduction of cellulite
  • Stimulation of lymphatic system/better immune system
  • Stimulation of circulation
  • Stress reduction/lower cortisol levels
  • Increased flexibility and range of motion
  • Faster recovery from exercise
  • Injury prevention

Check out this article from Dr. Axe to read more in-depth about the benefits and techniques of foam rolling:  https://draxe.com/foam-roller-exercises/

Posted in Everyday Prevention,Healing,Lifestyle | Leave a reply

Meditation? Yes, It’s Good For Almost Everything!

Posted 11 June 2018 by prehab

What do you think of when you hear the word: “meditation?”blog post

Until recently, I thought of meditation as sitting, legs crossed on a pillow on the ground and staring calmly at a wall for 30 minutes or more. My image of meditation was boring and frankly, seemed impossible to get into. However, with all the recent hype about meditation within the wellness community, I decided to give it a try. I now use an app on my phone called “Headspace”…. and I love it. You can download this or other apps (there are so many!) and test it out free of charge. The apps provide what is called a “guided meditation,” meaning a calm voice explains the principles of meditation and reminds you to pay attention to your breath. You can select the level of meditation you are comfortable with from Beginner to Advanced. Rest assured that you will not be overwhelmed as a beginner—it’s easy to start for a handful of minutes! What I’m learning is that the key to meditation is not necessarily the amount of time you spend, rather it’s your consistency with it. I started with a daily 3-minute session and gradually worked my way up to 5 minutes a day. Personally, I change the time of day based on my schedule, but some people find a consistent meditation schedule to be helpful in holding them accountable. I promise you, you can carve out 3 minutes a day to help your body and mind. And with all the AMAZING, scientifically-proven benefits listed in the article from “Live and Dare” below, why not give it a try? Check this article out!

https://liveanddare.com/benefits-of-meditation/

Posted in Everyday Prevention,Healing,Lifestyle | Leave a reply

ACL Prehab Program Decreases Injury Rates and Improves Hip/Knee Biomechanics

Posted 24 May 2018 by prehab

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL is a ligament in the knee joint, which supports the knee during jumping, landing and cutting tasks that are common in most sports. It is estimated that 100,000-250,000 ACL injuries occur each year in the United States frequently leading to reconstructive surgeries and 6 months to 1 year of rehabilitation to get back to sport.

So, why rehab when you can Prehab?

Research in the field of preventative programs has demonstrated a reduction of ACL injuries in female athletes by 74%. Female athletes are 2-10 times more likely to sustain an ACL injury as opposed to their male counterparts. This statistic is most evident in the 2017-2018 Notre Dame Female Basketball Team, which has lost four athletes to ACL injuries this season.

A recent 2017 study by Pollard et al in The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine demonstrated an improvement of Hip and Knee mechanics of female soccer players with participation in the Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance (PEP) Program, which was developed by the Santa Monica Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Research Foundation. This study demonstrated improved use of hip musculature during landing tasks, which protects the ACL instead of relying on ligamentous support and quadriceps extensor moments, which have been associated with ACL injury. Enhancing athlete performance and decreasing ACL injuries can be the difference between a mediocre season and a championship run. Coaches and trainers at all levels of sports across the country are now incorporating Prehab programs for their athletes.

Could your athletes gain a competitive edge this season with a comprehensive performance enhancement and injury prevention program?

Stay tuned for more information about our ACL Prehab and Perform Program, which incorporates evidence-based PEP Program with the standardized Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) for a customized approach to athlete performance enhancement and ACL injury prevention.athlete-ball-fight-2209

For a free Prehab report of 7 secrets to stop knee pain follow the link below:

Knee Pain

Check out the links below for more details about the study and statistics mentioned in this post:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593213/
https://www.functionalmovement.com/system/sfma
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5505503/
https://www.swishappeal.com/2018/1/2/16841802/lili-thompson-notre-dame-injures-knee-acc-ncaaw

By Dr. Arsen Virobyan, DPT

Posted in Everyday Prevention,Healing,Lifestyle,Sports Injury Prevention | Leave a reply

How to avoid Exertional Heat Illness during Training and Competition

Posted 23 February 2013 by prehab

Hot environments under athletic competition can present an athlete severe challenges. Heat exhaustion may be complex and difficult to fully comprehend because athletes are variably affected during high-intensity exercise in hot humid environments. Avoidance is the best cure; however adhering to known measures will limit approaching dangerous overheating levels. Current knowledge depends on the judicious field documentation of athletes who push beyond normal physiological limits. For example, EHS, the most severe form of heat illness, cannot be studied in the laboratory because the risks of severe hyperthermia are ethically unacceptable for human research. The survival of athletes reaching such limits depends on the early recognition and effective cooling therapy as highlighted by Prehab USA by clicking here.

 Her is attached also a position stand on Exertional heat Illness from the American College of Sports medicine. 

There are a few reviews of the available literature on Precooling and its application published in Sports Medicine.

Posted in Everyday Prevention,Sports Injury Prevention | Leave a reply

Lack of physical activity causes nearly 10% of all premature deaths in the world

Posted 16 January 2013 by prehab

 A new study published in The Lancet found that lack of physical activity causes nearly 10% of all premature deaths in the world, primarily due to cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and breast and colon cancers. Physical inactivity is responsible for an estimated 5.3 million of the 57 million deaths that occurred worldwide in 2008 and is comparable to the impact of well-known chronic disease risk factors such as smoking and obesity. In contrast, more than 1.3 million deaths worldwide could be prevented if more people got the recommended dose of this powerful drug that is 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, such as brisk walking for 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Furthermore, if we could eliminate physical inactivity, the life expectancy of the world’s population would increase by 0.68 years. See details of the study published in Lancet

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Posted in Everyday Prevention | Leave a reply