Category: Everyday Prevention

How to avoid Exertional Heat Illness during Training and Competition

Posted 23 February 2013 by prehab

Hot environments under athletic competition can present an athlete severe challenges. Heat exhaustion may be complex and difficult to fully comprehend because athletes are variably affected during high-intensity exercise in hot humid environments. Avoidance is the best cure; however adhering to known measures will limit approaching dangerous overheating levels. Current knowledge depends on the judicious field documentation of athletes who push beyond normal physiological limits. For example, EHS, the most severe form of heat illness, cannot be studied in the laboratory because the risks of severe hyperthermia are ethically unacceptable for human research. The survival of athletes reaching such limits depends on the early recognition and effective cooling therapy as highlighted by Prehab USA by clicking here.

 Her is attached also a position stand on Exertional heat Illness from the American College of Sports medicine. 

There are a few reviews of the available literature on Precooling and its application published in Sports Medicine.

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Lack of physical activity causes nearly 10% of all premature deaths in the world

Posted 16 January 2013 by prehab

 A new study published in The Lancet found that lack of physical activity causes nearly 10% of all premature deaths in the world, primarily due to cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and breast and colon cancers. Physical inactivity is responsible for an estimated 5.3 million of the 57 million deaths that occurred worldwide in 2008 and is comparable to the impact of well-known chronic disease risk factors such as smoking and obesity. In contrast, more than 1.3 million deaths worldwide could be prevented if more people got the recommended dose of this powerful drug that is 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, such as brisk walking for 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Furthermore, if we could eliminate physical inactivity, the life expectancy of the world’s population would increase by 0.68 years. See details of the study published in Lancet

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