Category: Sports Injury Prevention

ACL Prehab Program Decreases Injury Rates and Improves Hip/Knee Biomechanics

Posted 24 May 2018 by prehab

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL is a ligament in the knee joint, which supports the knee during jumping, landing and cutting tasks that are common in most sports. It is estimated that 100,000-250,000 ACL injuries occur each year in the United States frequently leading to reconstructive surgeries and 6 months to 1 year of rehabilitation to get back to sport.

So, why rehab when you can Prehab?

Research in the field of preventative programs has demonstrated a reduction of ACL injuries in female athletes by 74%. Female athletes are 2-10 times more likely to sustain an ACL injury as opposed to their male counterparts. This statistic is most evident in the 2017-2018 Notre Dame Female Basketball Team, which has lost four athletes to ACL injuries this season.

A recent 2017 study by Pollard et al in The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine demonstrated an improvement of Hip and Knee mechanics of female soccer players with participation in the Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance (PEP) Program, which was developed by the Santa Monica Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Research Foundation. This study demonstrated improved use of hip musculature during landing tasks, which protects the ACL instead of relying on ligamentous support and quadriceps extensor moments, which have been associated with ACL injury. Enhancing athlete performance and decreasing ACL injuries can be the difference between a mediocre season and a championship run. Coaches and trainers at all levels of sports across the country are now incorporating Prehab programs for their athletes.

Could your athletes gain a competitive edge this season with a comprehensive performance enhancement and injury prevention program?

Stay tuned for more information about our ACL Prehab and Perform Program, which incorporates evidence-based PEP Program with the standardized Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) for a customized approach to athlete performance enhancement and ACL injury prevention.athlete-ball-fight-2209

For a free Prehab report of 7 secrets to stop knee pain follow the link below:

Knee Pain

Check out the links below for more details about the study and statistics mentioned in this post:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593213/
https://www.functionalmovement.com/system/sfma
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5505503/
https://www.swishappeal.com/2018/1/2/16841802/lili-thompson-notre-dame-injures-knee-acc-ncaaw

By Dr. Arsen Virobyan, DPT

Posted in Everyday Prevention,Healing,Lifestyle,Sports Injury Prevention | Leave a reply

How to avoid Exertional Heat Illness during Training and Competition

Posted 23 February 2013 by prehab

Hot environments under athletic competition can present an athlete severe challenges. Heat exhaustion may be complex and difficult to fully comprehend because athletes are variably affected during high-intensity exercise in hot humid environments. Avoidance is the best cure; however adhering to known measures will limit approaching dangerous overheating levels. Current knowledge depends on the judicious field documentation of athletes who push beyond normal physiological limits. For example, EHS, the most severe form of heat illness, cannot be studied in the laboratory because the risks of severe hyperthermia are ethically unacceptable for human research. The survival of athletes reaching such limits depends on the early recognition and effective cooling therapy as highlighted by Prehab USA by clicking here.

 Her is attached also a position stand on Exertional heat Illness from the American College of Sports medicine. 

There are a few reviews of the available literature on Precooling and its application published in Sports Medicine.

Posted in Everyday Prevention,Sports Injury Prevention | Leave a reply

Why Stretching Is Essential In Sports Injury Prevention

Posted 18 December 2012 by prehab

A sports injury can be debilitating to both the body of the athlete as well as to his career. The athlete suffers physically due to pain. His body requires care and some time to heal itself. In addition, his performance may suffer because he must put training and practice on hold until his body heals.

In order to prevent both short-term and long-term debilitating injuries to professional and amateur athletes alike, every sports physiotherapist is trained to focus on warm-up and cool-down stretching. Properly performed stretching has a number of muscular benefits that help prevent sports injury.

Preparing for action

The athlete must be physically prepared for the game. Warm-up stretching prepares the muscles for the demand of the sport. It decreases the risk of muscle pulls and strains by warming the muscle temperature and increasing blood flow and oxygen supply. Stretching also prepares the athlete for action mentally and gives him the confidence he needs for good and safe performance.

Cooling down

As essential as the warm up, cool-down stretches help eliminate waste products, such as lactic acid. These waste products build up in the muscles during intense activity. Cool-down stretches also help prevent blood pooling and can help prevent muscles from becoming tight and sore.

Increasing flexibility

Stretching helps increase and maximize the range of motion in joints as well as muscles. The muscles and joints of an athlete must be capable of meeting the demands of flexibility placed on them. Injury often occurs when the athlete exceeds his existing range of motion.

Improving coordination

Maximized range of motion in limbs and joints also gives the athlete enhanced balance and coordination. This allows him to maintain his mobility. It makes him less prone to become off-balance and injured. This is especially true for an athlete who participates in a sport which requires a high degree of coordination such as gymnastics or basketball.

Elongating muscles

Stretching helps reduce the risk of injury by slowly lengthening the muscle. It makes the tendons and muscles more limber and can prevent pulled muscles or tendons during play.

Helping build muscle mass

Stretched muscles are more limber and can be worked to their full extent when building muscle mass. An athlete who do not stretch, or stretches improperly, cannot build long and full muscles. As a result, his performance suffers and he is at increased risk of injury.

Stretching is a crucial part of sports physiotherapy. In helps prepare the athlete for maximum physical performance and minimizes the risk of sports injury.

————————

Aubrey Reeves is a freelance blogger who specializes on green and healthy living. Stay tuned for her healthy natural tips and guides about pain management and Queen St Physiotherapy by visiting <a href=”http://queenstphysio.com.au/”>http://queenstphysio.com.au/</a> .

Posted in Sports Injury Prevention | Leave a reply

Welcome to Prehab!

Posted 10 December 2012 by Fred Tatlyan

This page will be filled with more blog posts in the future about sports and preab!

Posted in Sports Injury Prevention | Leave a reply